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Deep restoration

Job 42.7-10 Restoration for Job’s friends is when they seek God’s forgiveness and Job’s.  Restoration for Job is when he prays for his friends.  Here is deep repentance: Job’s friends not only seek forgiveness but ask Job to pray for God to forgive them.  Here is deep forgiveness: Job not only forgives his friends but prays for God to do so.  In so doing, Job anticipated the greater Job to come.  (Luke...

posted on: Oct 17, 2010 | author: Alan Burrow

Nobility, affliction, and friendship

Job 19.1-5; 29.21 – 30.1; 30.9-10. Never was Job so noble as when he was humbled in his affliction.  Yet never was he held in such low esteem by his friends.  Sometimes Christians suffer because of their sin.  Sometimes Christians (like Job) suffer because they are special to God — and He wants to make them more special.  We are often dense at telling the difference — like Job’s three friends.  There is a part of us as sinners which secretly (and sometimes not so secretly) takes pleasure in the fall of another.  Not a fall into to sin necessarily, but a fall from glory, from position and prestige.  Even if we had nothing against the person, their...

posted on: Oct 16, 2010 | author: Alan Burrow

Can a man save himself? Depends.

Can a man save himself to any degree and in any sense of the word? This certainly is one of the longest running debates of sinners and saints, scholars and ain’t. The currency of  the debate is always the same, although it can be transacted in pennies or pounds sterling. The box seats version typically involves a series of salvos over free will and total depravity, with lots of proof texts flying through the air . The cheap seats version is shorter but has more local color: “I’m not perfect, but I’m good at heart, and I do my best . . . ” (the rest of the argument is unstated but clearly implied, and it goes like...

posted on: Aug 16, 2010 | author: Alan Burrow

Afflictions bearing names

“A bullet don’t got nobody’s name on it.” So I was instructed years ago by a prosecution witness explaining the dangers of life in the ‘hood. Unlike bullets in the ‘hood, afflictions from the Lord are not random. They do have someone’s name on them. Job’s afflictions began with God saying to Satan, “Have you considered My servant Job?” (Job 1.8.) Bullets with no names on them are a good cause for fear; afflictions with names on them are good cause for comfort: “I know, O Lord, that your judgments are right, and that in faithfulness you have afflicted me.  . . .  Before I was afflicted, I went astray, but now I keep your word.  . ....

posted on: Aug 11, 2010 | author: Alan Burrow