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The nature of unbelief.

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I had motive for not wanting the world to have a meaning; consequently I assumed that it had none, and was able without any difficulty to find satisfying reasons for this assumption. The philosopher who finds no meaning in the world is not concerned exclusively with a problem in pure metaphysics, he is also concerned to prove that there is no valid reason why he personally should not do as he wanted to do, or why his friends should not seize power and govern in the way that they find most advantageous to themselves … . For myself, the philosophy of meaninglessness was essentially an instrument of liberation, sexual and political. –Aldous Huxley

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Aldous Huxley, Ends and Means: An Inquiry into the Nature of Ideals and into the Methods Employed for Their Realization, p. 270 (Westport: Greenwood 1970) (quoted in Randy Newman, Questioning Evangelism: Engaging People’s Hearts the Way Jesus Did, p. 67 (Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications 2004)).)

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Creative Commons License
The nature of unbelief. by Alan Burrow, unless otherwise expressly stated, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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